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Park West Toulouse-Lautrec Lithograph on Display at London Museum

 In Art & Gallery News, Artists & Special Collections, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Eight examples of "Miss Loïe Fuller," a lithograph by Toulouse-Lautrec, on display at London's Barbican Centre. Photo credit © Max Colson

Eight examples of “Miss Loïe Fuller,” a lithograph by Toulouse-Lautrec, on display at London’s Barbican Centre. Photo credit © Max Colson

It’s hard to think of an artist more closely associated with the Parisian nightlife than Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. His iconic posters for the Moulin Rouge nightclub in Paris’ Montmartre district transformed him into a 19th-century art world celebrity.

That’s why London’s Barbican Centre saw Toulouse-Lautrec as an ideal artist to be featured at their new exhibition—Into the Night: Cabarets & Clubs in Modern Art—and that’s why Park West Gallery chose to loan the Barbican one of their original Toulouse-Lautrec lithographs for the exhibition.

According to the Barbican, “Spanning the 1880s to the 1960s, Into the Night celebrates the creative spaces where artists congregated to push the boundaries of artistic expression. The exhibition offers insight into the heady atmosphere of Berlin clubs in Weimar Germany; the energy of Harlem’s jazz scene; the vibrant context of the Mbari clubs in 1960s Nigeria; and many more.”

The entryway into the "Into the Night: Cabarets & Clubs in Modern Art" exhibition. Photo credit © Max Colson

The entryway into the “Into the Night: Cabarets & Clubs in Modern Art” exhibition. Photo credit © Max Colson

The lithograph on loan from Park West—”Miss Loïe Fuller’—was created in 1893. For Into the Night, it appears in a gallery focused on Fuller, who was a notorious American dancer known for her elaborate nightclub performances in 1890s Paris.

The Barbican gallery notes that Fuller became a sensation for her “radical experiments with costume, production design, and stage lighting. She began playing with the mesmerising effects she could produce while dancing with poles and lengths of silk in the glow of continually shifting coloured lighting. These experiments culminated in the hypnotic ‘Serpentine Dance’ for which she is still remembered.”

The Park West lithograph appears alongside other examples of Toulouse-Lautrec’s Fuller lithographs, showing the dancer with her flowing silks in motion.

Toulouse-Lautrec's "Miss Loïe Fuller" lithographs share gallery space at the Barbican with other posters promoting Fuller's elaborate performances. Photo credit © Max Colson

Toulouse-Lautrec’s “Miss Loïe Fuller” lithographs share gallery space at the Barbican with other posters promoting Fuller’s elaborate performances. Photo credit © Max Colson

“Park West is no stranger to loaning art from our archives to museums,” says Park West Gallery Director David Gorman. “Making art accessible to the world is something that has remained throughout our 50-year history. Our own museum is open to the public seven days a week and we constantly have works loaned to various museums at any given time of the year, including works by Picasso and Dali. We think art is an important component in an enriched life and, through Park West’s museum and cruise line partnerships, and through the Park West Foundation, we are able to bring fine art to the world.”

Into the Night: Cabarets & Clubs in Modern Art will be featured at the Barbican until January 19, 2020.

The Park West Museum in Michigan has its own Toulouse-Lautrec gallery, showcasing a large selection of untitled works from the artist’s personal sketchbooks.

The Toulouse-Lautrec gallery at Park West Museum in Southfield, Michigan.

The Toulouse-Lautrec gallery at Park West Museum in Southfield, Michigan.

 

If you’re interested in collecting a work by Toulouse-Lautrec, contact our gallery consultants at (800) 521-9654 ext. 4 during business hours or sales@parkwestgallery.com.

You can find more information about visiting Park West Museum here.

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