High Kicks and Low Life: Toulouse-Lautrec Prints

 In Art & Gallery News, Artists & Special Collections, Exhibits, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

LIVERPOOL — The Walker Art Gallery presents High Kicks and Low Life: Toulouse-Lautrec Prints, on view now through August 8.

From the museum website:

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Park West GalleryThis exquisite exhibition of around 50 prints by the artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901), depicts the glamour and style of 19th century Parisian theatre and daily life.

High Kicks and Low Life: Toulouse-Lautrec Prints presents a selection from the British Museum’s fine holdings of Toulouse-Lautrec’s graphic work.

Divided into two sections, ‘Scenes from Theatrical Life’ and ‘Scenes from Daily Life’, the former presents striking images of the can-can dancer Louise Weber, known as ‘La Goulue’ (‘The Glutton’) and Jane Avril, one of Lautrec’s favourite subjects. In contrast to the lively exuberant scenes of the cafés and bars of Montmartre, Lautrec portrays with great sensitivity the extremely private and intimate life of the prostitute in the second section of the exhibition.

The artist lived briefly in several brothels and captured at first hand the daily rituals of feminine life, beautifully executed in the Elles portfolio of 1896.

Though Lautrec’s last years were plagued by alcoholic excess, this remarkable artist has left behind a body of work full of insight, wit and above all astonishing technical and artistic virtuosity.

For more information, please visit www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk


French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec is considered one of the great masters of Post-Impressionism. Although exhibitions of Toulouse-Lautrec’s work were not well received in his lifetime, he is now one of the world’s most popular artists, represented in most major museums of France and the United States. The Park West Gallery/Toulouse-Lautrec Collection »

Related Links:

Recommended Posts
Comments
  • louisegandolfi3
    Reply

    These images are stunning. The parisean life back in the 19th century, the busyness of the streets and cafe’s sets such a picturesque scene, and the paintings portray this beautifully.

Leave a Comment