fbpx

Latest News

Behind the Artist: Scott Jacobs

Scott Jacobs embraces freedom, individualism, and rebellion, much like the beloved Harley-Davidson motorcycles he enjoys riding and painting. Similarly, a look back at Jacobs’ rise to fame demonstrates his clear passion for hard work and trailblazing. Jacobs enjoyed drawing in his youth, but took his first steps into the art world by working for a framing store in his hometown in New Jersey. He eventually bought the store and made enough money to open his own art gallery named Reflections on Can...

Artist Q&A: Scott Jacobs Answers 10 Revealing Questions

Scott Jacobs is an artist who definitely knows how to keep it real. Working in art since he was 19 years old, Jacobs has become world famous for his amazing photorealistic style. In fact, his lifelike paintings became so popular that the Harley-Davidson Motor Company selected Jacobs as its first-ever officially licensed artist. Today, the down-to-earth Jacobs and his family own their own studio in Deadwood, South Dakota, and he continues to attract fans around the globe. Want to get to know the...

Park West and Scott Jacobs Help Raise Funds for Young Musicians

When Park West Gallery teams up with its artists for a good cause, they make great music together. Park West Gallery helped raise $7,000 for the Amelia Island Jazz Festival’s music scholarship program during the festival’s 7th Annual Big Band Bash gala on February 17. The Amelia Island Jazz Festival is a non-profit organization that provides funds to aspiring jazz musicians. Spearheaded by iconic drummer Les DeMerle, the organization’s outreach programs also include music education and enrichmen...

Artist Scott Jacobs Refuses to Quit After Motorcycle Accident

Since the age of 15, Scott Jacobs has been riding motorcycles. At just 19 years old, he began his art career by opening his own gallery, making a living in fine art ever since. But everything changed after a traumatic motorcycle accident in 2016 when the photorealist artist found himself lying in a Maryland hospital, forced to confront the fact that he might never ride or paint again. “It was horrible—I was very, very emotional in the hospital,” Jacobs said. “This is all I’ve done my entire life...