Artists / Patrick Guyton

Patrick Guyton

Patrick Guyton

1964–

Patrick Guyton weaves together the art of the 14th-century Kamakura Period in Japanese gold leafing with the 17th-century Flemish Masters technique of glazing. By doing so, he creates a unique fusion that harmonizes the dramatic and poetic expressions from both dynasties into his own breathtaking metallic mediums.

A skilled draftsman and painter, early in his career, Guyton honed his skills working directly with such animation legends as Chuck Jones, Maurice Noble, and Robert McKimson Jr.

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PERSONAL HISTORY

Guyton was born in Pennsylvania in 1964 and quickly displayed an affinity for art, which was fully supported by his parents who were both artists and designers. At a young age, he learned fine art and commercial sign painting from his father. After a brief stint as a furniture truck driver, in 1984, Guyton refined his art education at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, where he studied fine arts, sculpture, and design theory.

After graduating in 1987 with an Associate’s Degree in Visual Communications, Guyton moved to California with aspirations of becoming a musician. On the West Coast, Guyton turned to his artistic abilities to support himself.

In 1997, Guyton joined Linda Jones Enterprises/Warner Bros as a background painter for the legendary cartoonist and animator Chuck Jones. During this time, he was also privileged to study under Maurice Noble, who had played a huge role in shaping the animation industry since the 1950s. Guyton designed and painted many background scenes for Jones, the most notable being the background for a limited-edition animation cel from the famous Bugs Bunny cartoon “What’s Opera, Doc?”

Guyton was also commissioned by Looney Tunes/McKimson Productions where he became the background painter for classic animator Robert McKimson Jr. “There is no other word than surreal for such a thing,” Guyton says. “That was a great experience, I got to work with a lot of iconic animators and background painters.”

At the time, Guyton was painting commissions and passionately pursuing his own career in fine art. In 2008, Guyton applied to be an artist’s assistant. He scored the job, but when the artist’s publisher saw Guyton’s work, he instead immediately offered to represent Guyton.

From that day on, Guyton’s career has continued to soar. Fans around the world have embraced his unique artwork, which utilizes rigorous metal gilding and leafing techniques to create unforgettable compositions incorporating thin sheets of silver, copper, and gold.

 

STYLE AND INFLUENCES

While studying art, Guyton immersed himself in the works of masters like Michelangelo, Tiepolo, and Monet as well as Rockwell, Earle, Noble, Bisley, and Roth.

However, he found himself particularly inspired by the gold and silver leaf work of the Japanese Kamakura period and the glazing techniques of the Flemish Masters. He soon created his own unique style of imagery, which he calls “Gilded Modernism,” using the substrate of Japanese leafing as part of his medium.

Guyton now specializes in gold and silver leaf artwork, creating contemporary variations of traditional Japanese and Venetian style works. He has expanded to using other precious metals in his artwork, such as copper, platinum and palladium.

Since metal will normally expand and contract in different temperatures, Guyton had to develop a way to keep his paintings intact. He experimented for a year to find the perfect formulation for his boards, eventually creating boards that are metal with a special plastic core. These special boards are now manufactured exclusively for him to use in his art.

Guyton’s ability to design with such sophisticated detail brings an unrivaled level of drama and poetic expression to his work.

Discussing his art, Guyton has said, “I want my collectors to take away a sense of enjoyment of the art for its sheer beauty, depth of elegance, simplicity, sense of calm, radiance, and cohesive structure. It’s not unusual for my clients to become emotional and, often times, they cry because the art has affected them in unexpected ways. You can’t plan for that effect, but it’s extremely satisfying to know you have touched someone that deeply.”

Latest News About Patrick Guyton

Meet the Artist: 10 Questions with Patrick Guyton

Patrick Guyton has combined his passion for ancient art techniques with a tenacious work ethic to create a truly unique body of work. Guyton’s art is a sight to behold. He carefully hand-applies [...]