What Makes a Master Artist? Meet 7 Legendary Masters in Our New Video

 

What is great art?

While it’s difficult to weigh the impact of Ancient Greek pottery to Impressionist paintings, art history is defined by certain watershed moments. These huge leaps forward stretch the creative and intellectual capabilities of humankind and produce artistic works that effortlessly withstand the test of time.

Their creators? Today, they’re known as the Masters.

In this fascinating new video, Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro invites you to meet seven of the most influential art world masters of all time—Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt van Rijn, Francisco Goya, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Marc Chagall, and Joan Miró.

Etching by Rembrandt van Rijn

But how did these seven men change art forever? Shapiro says, “It’s not something you can describe with words, but you feel it in your soul and you know what it is when you see it. It’s the mark of the master.”

Each of these artistic geniuses had a monumental impact on the evolution of art and aesthetics, inspiring generations of artists who followed in their footsteps.

Park West Gallery Director Morris Shapiro discussing seven true masters of art.

You can learn more about the lives and legacies of these artists in the above video, which explains why each one undeniably deserves the title of “Master.”

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All seven of these master artists have works on display at Park West Museum in Southfield, Michigan, just outside of Detroit. The museum is open and free to the public. (You can find more information about visiting here.)

Here’s just a small selection of works by these legendary artists that are currently being showcased at Park West Museum.

Albrecht Dürer

“St. Anthony Reading” (1519), Albrecht Dürer, engraving.

Rembrandt van Rijn

“The Raising of Lazarus: The Larger Plate” (c. 1630), Rembrandt Van Rijn, etching.

Francisco Goya

“Por Una Navaja” (On Account of a Knife, c. 1810-1820), Francisco Goya, etching.

Pablo Picasso

“Nature Morte au Crane” (c. 1960), Pablo Picasso, aquatint.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

“La Cabane a Cagnes” (1917), Pierre-Auguste Renoir, oil painting on canvas.

Marc Chagall

“Philetas’ Orchard” (1961), Marc Chagall, lithograph.

Joan Miró

Three works by Joan Miró—”Le Somnambule” (1974), etching; “La Meneuse de Lune” (1975), lithograph; and “La Marchande de Couleurs” (1981), etching.

 

If you’re interested in collecting the works of any of these master artists, Park West can help. Just contact our gallery consultants at (800) 521-9654 ext. 4 or at sales@parkwestgallery.com.

 

LEARN MORE ABOUT ART HISTORY’S MASTERS:

 

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